If QR codes are here to stay, is this an opportunity they should grab now?

Photo by Albert Hu on Unsplash

Over the past month or so I’ve started to examine potential new areas of growth for the restaurant industry. With the pandemic still a menace to all things hospitality, my aim with these short column ideas is to look outside the box. In essence, consider concepts that restaurateurs may not have thought of. You can read my first two articles here and here.

For today’s idea I want to discuss price fluctuations, specifically why restaurants should start implementing the practice. Full disclaimer: this thought is…


photo credit Alan MacBain

There’s this truthful line Johnny Depp recites from the movie Blow which I’m always reminded of whenever I think about my life and those around me. I always wonder how closely it fits with each person’s reality.

“Most people’s lives pass them by as they are making grand plans for them.”

From Vox:

“Eating, paying for health insurance, all the bills that normal people have — those don’t go away just because you don’t make a lot of money, those things all exist,” he says.

“I want to know how much the people make who say $15 is too much…


The company has a chance to be better. It should take it.

This past Friday Amazon won a monumental battle in Bessemer, Alabama as employees for its warehouse voted down unionization. This isn’t shocking. Amazon did everything they could to dissuade this from happening.

From Recode:

Amazon pushed hard to convince workers to vote against unionization. The company set up an anti-union website that harped on the fact that union dues would cost full-time workers close to $500 a year. What the company didn’t say on the website is that, in Alabama, unions can’t require workers to pay union dues…


Cheap credit. Hungry investors. Rethinking the restaurant model could give the industry a much needed jolt and possibly even save it. Using a SPAC could be just the answer.

via pyments.com

It hasn’t been an easy year for the restaurant and bar industry to say the least. This pandemic has exposed its many flaws in brutal fashion. Lockdowns, limited seating, added PPE precautions and dependance on third part delivery apps are just some of the issues restaurateurs have had to deal with on top of the myriad they already face daily. …


What’s the angle? Is there a bigger play here?

In a week which saw Spotify purchase Clubhouse competitor Locker Room to help them compete in the emerging live audio sphere, Squarespace, the prominent website builder for startups, chose to one up this move with their own acquisition of the restaurant reservation platform Tock.

From Bloomberg:

Website-hosting service Squarespace Inc., a $10 billion company that has confidentially filed for an initial public offering, is buying restaurant-services provider Tock for more than $400 million.

Squarespace paid a mix of cash and stock for the Chicago-based company, which provides technology for online reservations…


This is a follow-up to my Substack And Medium: The Difficult Battle For A Future In Journalism essay from this weekend.

“After the better part of a decade chasing audiences from platform to platform, I set out to build a strong, direct connection to an audience that wants to hear from me, and that I can reliably reach no matter how many likes, upvotes, or retweets any individual post happens to get.”

— Casey Newton, The Verge

I wrote my column on Thursday night not knowing that The Ringer would be publishing a feature with a similar theme. Actually, several


Medium aims to provide real opportunity. Substack is looking to do the same. Are both models flawed or is the system just broken?

“The role of publications — in the world, not just on Medium — has decreased in the modern era,” — Ev Williams, Medium Founder

In a column I wrote last week about the rise of subscriptions in news publications, I proposed the idea of social media companies following suit. With Apple set to change their privacy rules for third party tracking next month, the move towards subscriptions for tech giants TikTok and Instagram, seemed obvious. …


This is a response to a recent feature from The Tyee titled, “Yet Another Housing Survey, for a City That Seems to Love Them.”

“False Creek South is one of Vancouver’s pioneering waterfront communities. It is a highly liveable and walkable inner-city neighbourhood with a unique mix of land uses, housing types and tenures, transportation options, urban character, and amenities.” — Vancouver.ca

There’s a certain amount of eeriness I found in reading this column in The Tyee on Friday as it was not just a day or two prior where I was discussing the peculiarities of said neighborhood with my…


Targeted ads, privacy issues, bots – is it in our best interest to start paying for them?

One of the best decisions I’ve made recently was going premium with my YouTube account. Having to watch one and sometimes two ads per video grew increasingly annoying. Paying $12 per month was a no brainer in avoiding this irritation.

Hold that thought.

From Recode:

If you have a TikTok account and you don’t like getting targeted ads, you soon may not have a choice. …


What are those precious photos and moments really worth? For some, they could be a lot.

Beeple

When I was twelve, I used to join my two older brothers on the weekends helping their Dad sell sports cards. This was the early 90s, and at the time, big business. Each Saturday I stood and helped sell hockey memorabilia and trading cards to rapid fans eager to collect and make a buck. The shop was small but packed to the brim most days. It was thrilling. To this day I still have mint Eric Lindros and Shaquille O’Neal rookie cards. What they’re…

Jamie Mah

Track and Food (Editor, Podcast Host) | Scout Magazine (Contributor) | Sommelier | NBA junkie and lover of a good cookie.

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